How To Enjoy Gaming Experiences

Most of us love playing games on our computers, tablets, and smartphones. However, the games that we play on our consoles and computers do a much better job of creating a realistic experience. Video games are not only great for bonding with people we know, they are also a good medium for making new friends as well.

Here is how you can get the most out of modern video games:

Watch your expenses:

Heavy video game titles, especially when they just come out, are quite expensive. Some games cost even more than $50. Most people find such prices to be unreasonable. That does not mean you always have to spend a fortune in order to enjoy these games.

Here are some ways to enjoy games at cheaper rates.

  • Wait for a few months after the games have been released, because prices come down quite significantly
  • Shop on holidays and events, especially on Cyber Monday, when you get crazy discounts
  • Consider buying legitimate used games from the market, as they are considerably cheaper

However, do not buy pirated games, because it takes away the fun. Also, if you are playing online games, then your copy needs to be licensed and registered to get all the features.

Playing family friendly games

Many games out there are meant to be played exclusively by adults, and they might even contain a bit of profanity. If you want to enjoy the gaming experience with your children, then you will want to avoid such titles. The best way to find out is to check for the ESRB ratings. They are very much like movie ratings that separate adult content from family friendly ones.

Here are some things you should do to make your experience better:

  • Set up a family online account on your consoles, so you can save your history and continue from where you left off the last time
  • When you enable the internet on your console, make sure that the privacy settings are enabled the way you want
  • Disable automatic payments for in-game upgrades, as kids might inadvertently choose the wrong options and waste money
  • Game strategies to help you succeed
  • Some of the console games that come out today have complex strategies. You will take a while to get the hang of them.

If you play a lot of first person shooter (or FPS) games:

  • Make sure you play individually for a while, so that you understand how all the options work
  • Do not reload your gun in the game. Always hide or crouch when reloading, else another player can kill you while reloading
  • The key to doing well in shooter games is staying alive, so it is always defense first
  • Save your games at different points, so you can go back to a previous state if you don’t like what you did.

Console games are not just entertainment, but also give the brain and body workout. They also help children in developing many physical and mental skills. More importantly, they let you relieve your stress after a hard day’s work.

Deal Behind In App Purchase

I can’t say I like titles as question sentences, but then again I do many other things that I don’t like, such as spending money on “In-App Purchases”. This is just a dollar, so what is the big deal anyway, right? Well, I am getting directly into the topic.

Let’s start with a rough definition of in-app purchases for those who are not familiar with this term (not sure if there is somebody living in a cave). An in-app purchase refers to items, services, points, coins, anything valuable in the game that a player can buy. I myself see this”anything valuable” in 2 categories.

The first one is anything that affects your gameplay, or anything that gives you different kinds of advantages over all other players or monsters. Let’s say there are 2 kinds of currencies in the game and one of these currencies is extremely hard to get, or you just get it once a day or limited somehow. The game offers you this “extremely hard to get currency” in its “in app shop”. As a dedicated and impatient player you don’t want to collect enough of these currencies for a year to get your dream weapon and you instead, buy this currency using the notorious “in app shop”.

The second category is cosmetics which means only visual changes or visual add-ons. For example, a pet that goes everywhere with you doing nothing at all. For example, a beautiful hat that offers you nothing but a nice image.

While I hate the first category, I always support the latter. Buying something, knowing it will do nothing any good to your character or gameplay means you are supporting people spending their time to present you that game you are playing. Or it just means that you like using visuals that not so many people use! Either way this, in my opinion, means that you are doing it right!

We have a perfect example that includes both categories; World of Warcraft. You already pay for the game, pay for subscription to be able to play, and Blizzard is still trying to sell you something like pets and mounts or some services like character visual change or sex change right? Well, I support this.

However, WoW is also trying to sell you some important services like server change, which I don’t support. I don’t want to be misunderstood here, so let me tell that I don’t want to see all players change servers whenever they want. But Blizzard definitely should work on this, maybe a free server change per year is a good idea. Or maybe they at least should lower the price. This is tricky, I know, but if you have been playing WoW for years, you probably have characters scattered all around and you are unwilling to pay huge amounts to gather all your characters in the same server. After all you can’t know what will change in future. Maybe you will have to move your main character to another server leaving some other characters…

That was our well-known Blizzard example. As many of you may know that we have much worse examples, especially mobile games and Facebook games. As far as I remember I can say this started with Farm Ville. Tell me if I am wrong, but Knight Online or Silkroad or any other game before Farm Ville could not do what Farm Ville accomplished! It is like these guys just poisoned the game industry and left like nothing happened. Now all developers and all companies think this is pretty normal to sell people important stuff in the game, stuff that affect gameplay. No, this is not normal I tell you. Knowing this I still spent some money on games until I understood that even spending money it is very hard to get what you want, you just have to spend more!

Yes, this is what these developers want. They want you to buy more and more diamonds, for example let’s call this extremely hard to get currency “diamond”. You buy some diamonds and use these diamonds to open some chests and you get crap, and then you buy some more diamonds to open some more chests and you get lucky once! Then you decide to buy more diamonds!

A weird example is that you can buy a level 60 skill when you are level 1. Oh my god… Another example is that you either have to wait for a month to upgrade your weapon / skill or you have to pay for it. Pretty fair right?

Yes, these guys changed the gaming world very much, up to a point that people buy even skills for their characters. I used to spend money on games, but I can say that I am trying hard to not do it again, and you know what my solution is? Ignoring games that offer in-app purchases when I see them, or (%99 of mobile games offer in-app purchases) I just download them hoping maybe they sell just cosmetics, then uninstall when I see that ugly picture.

Let’s forget about mobile games for a second and take a look at Diablo example. When it was published, people could buy and sell stuff on auction house and Blizzard got paid commission for each transaction. What was the game like back then? ****! Drop rates were terrible, literally terrible for such a game that was almost only drop oriented, even when you got epic item there were no reason to get excited because it would probably turn out an intelligence item when you were playing a barbarian… I can’t even find words to describe how terrible Diablo 3 was at those times. Then Blizzard changed it completely. They removed AH and fixed drop rates and now D3 is a perfect game fit to the Blizzard brand. By the way, I spent (wasted) over 100 euros on items hoping I could kill faster and get more items to sell in return. How stupid…

And for those who do not know already I will talk about Path of Exile example. A perfect example for our second category. They sell only cosmetics, and they also sell storage slots, but let’s ignore that for a while. They generally sell cosmetics stuff. I could pay to play such a nice game personally but the game is free itself. If you like Diablo like games, try Path of Exile and you will understand what I am saying better.

Well, this topic never ends with short articles like this, as the list just goes on. I did not even say anything about children who make purchases using their parent’s credit cards. That would make this article much longer. There are many other related topics that could make this article much longer, but I am putting an end to this for now.

Youtube Influencer You Should Now

In YouTube and other social media platforms, any niche and any topic could lead you to earn huge profits just by uploading your videos and sharing it with the world. Every view counts, every like is worth a penny and every share is a traffic booster.

Online games have brought a lot of fun and excitement to our online community. As online games and online community increases from time to time, influencers are making more and more profits too. How does it work?

Here’s a list of Top Gaming Influencers on YouTube and how they started:

Mark Fischbach

Also known as Markiplier, a Hawaii-born army dropped out of college where he studied engineering, to grow his career as a YouTube gaming commentator. Specializing in the horror genre, his videos have been viewed over 7 billion times in five years. His ultimate sign of crossover success? He inked a deal with mega-agency William Morris Endeavor in 2016.

Felix Kjellberg

Also known as PewDiePie is the world’s highest-paid YouTube Influencer in 2016. The Swedish gamer would have topped the Gaming category if not for the nine videos he posted in early 2017, which contains Nazi imagery. Maker Studios, a subsidiary of Disney which is also his multi-channel network partner severed ties with him. He was also booted from YouTube’s Red platform and the Google Preferred program. He continues to make millions from YouTube ads alone while his brand is tarnished.

Evan Fong

A Canadian-born also was known as VanossGaming, to pursue his online career full-time, he dropped out of the University of Pennsylvania. He chats and makes jokes with his friends and collaborators while playing games like Call of Duty or Grand Theft Auto on his YouTube Channel. He began voicing a character in adult cartoon series ‘Paranormal Action Squad’ for YouTube Red in 2016.

Sonja Reid

Also known as Omgitsfirefoxx, she first started live-streaming on gaming platform twitch in 2013. She posts highlights to YouTube where she quickly amassed an impressive following which had lead to partnerships with brands like Audi, Syfy, and Intel.

SSSniperWolf

A British-born YouTube influencer is also known as Lia Wolf which specializes in Call of Duty gameplay videos, also dabbles in cosplay and anime. With her over 5 million subscribers and followers, it had led her to partnerships with the likes of Activision, EA, Ubisoft, and Disney. She said, “I wanted to show that girls can play and be good at video games too.”

Jacksepticeye

His real name is Sean McLoughlin. He first took to YouTube in 2012 and then started posting daily in 2013. He is best known for his energetic and funny commentary. With his videos that have been viewed over 7.2 billion times, he is signed with Revelmode, a subnetwork of Disney’s Maker Studios.

DanTDM

Daniel Middleton is a professional gamer who is known online as DanTDM or The Diamond Minecraft. His mastery of popular family-friendly game Minecraft and his following had set him a Guinness World Record in 2016 for amassing the most views for a dedicated Minecraft channel which is 7.9 billion at the time.

TheSyndicateProject

Tom Cassell, the longtime gamer who was the first person to hit 1 million followers on live-streaming platform Twitch way back in 2014. Since then, he has received more than 10 million YouTube subscribers for his playthroughs of game franchises like Halo and Call of Duty. He is now signed to gaming influencer agency 3BlackDot with his fellow list members Sonja Reid and Evan Fong.

SkyDoesMinecraft

Adam Dahlberg, a YouTube veteran at the age of 24. He started as a voice actor for gaming videos back in 2006 and more than a decade on, his main channel focused on the hit kid-friendly game, Minecraft. He boasted over 11 million subscribers and he is now partnered with Amazon, Netflix, and Nintendo and sells merchandise to fans like posters and pillows.

Mari Takahashi

AtomicMari was the only female member of the mega-popular YouTube channel, Smosh Games, until early 2017. She stars in Maricraft, a sub-series with a focus on Minecraft gameplay. The former professional ballerina started hosting her Smosh Pit Weekly way back in 2010. Now, she boasts a social audience of over 2 million and in 2016, she competed as a cast member on the 33rd season of CBS hit called ‘Survivor.’

These YouTubers make millions a year by just playing and narrating video games.

Feeling Nostalgic With Games

Nostalgia. The word brings to mind a joyous familiarity felt when engaging in something in the present that we really enjoyed doing in the past. Gaming is no different. Everyone has games that bring back memories from, what we think of now as, better times. Hindsight is a like the snob that points out what you could have done, hindsight tells us our childhood may not have been as bad as we thought. As adults we know how the world works. When we were growing up, we never really had a grip on the world. Hindsight tells us that those times were better, safer, less complicated. Games that bring on nostalgia puts us in the mindset of a kid again. It makes us feel safe, secure, and protected. Humans have a natural tendency to want safety and protection. Especially the adults, because as adults we know just how quickly the world can go from OK one day, to horrible the next. As gamers we seek safety and security in games.

I started gaming when I was very young as most gamers my age did. I grew up playing Super Nintendo and Nintendo 64 with my mom and sister. Super Mario, Kirby, and Mario Cart were a few of the titles that we played. Zelda was perhaps the biggest game we played. My mom has problems with fast-moving games like Call of Duty and other highly graphic games. So we played Super Nintendo and what a time it was! Zelda on the Super Nintendo we beat many times. I say “we” but it was my mom playing not me or my sister. Even thinking about it while writing this I’m getting nostalgia. We kept getting close to the end and then the game wiping our save out so we started over like three times. It was good times. That was when I was around six or seven or eight. Long time ago. Nostalgia gives us hope for the future. It tells us that if good times happened in the past then more good times will happen in the future.

Later I started gaming on my own. It is hard to think about what game came next in chronological order but they all had a theme: single-player strategy. A broad gaming description that can fit a lot of games in it. Games like Pharaoh and Cleopatra, Age of Empires II, and of course Sid Meier’s Civilization III. I was not allowed to play shooters as they had bad language in them and so was restricted to single player games. My parents were very protective and games were not as prevalent twenty years ago as they are now. Pharaoh is a city builder placing you in ancient Egypt. The goal of the game was the build great cities using the resources at your disposal and it was quite a challenge for an eleven year old. Age of Empires II is a real-time strategy game that is completely different from pharaoh. You have to balance resource collection and troop production to take down either AI or other players. Civ III was probably my favorite game growing up. To this day, I still play pharaoh and age of empires II.

Think about what nostalgia is again for just a second. It is a feeling coming from a memory. A memory of “better times” that may or may not be accurate. Games we played a long time ago, that brings back those memories, might not continue to be fun. Civ III I played for hundreds of hours when I was younger is not as fun now that I am older so I do not play it as much now. Sometimes nostalgia lies.

In conclusion, nostalgia in games is a good thing. It allows us to relive parts of our childhood that we otherwise would not have a reason to bring back up from the depths of our minds. Many people say that video games lead to anti-social behavior, violence, and a drop in school grades. Video games teach us how the world is. When you are playing multiplayer of any game you will usually find people who are just toxic. It prepares for dealing with the worst society has to throw at us. Human beings are prone to violence. The first murder happened when Cain killed Abel back in Genesis. I am pretty sure at they did not have video games back then. So this point is always going to be moot. The only point that actually makes sense is the drop in school grades. It takes a great deal of discipline to do school work over video games. It builds character this discipline. So next time you feel nostalgia coming on, take some time to stop and smell the memories. Bask in the thoughts of better times and the hope that good times are still ahead, no matter what the world tells you in the present. This is what video game nostalgia teaches us.